Thanks for Visiting. Here’s what I’ve been up to since I last wrote:

In a couple of trips to Italy, I had a blast tracking down, hanging out with, and buying from the  famous coral and cameo carvers of Torre del Greco, on the Bay of Naples, and the  industrious goldsmiths in Italy’s Veneto region.

Visiting Torre del Greco I met Gioia De Simone, a gracious and lively young woman who is a fifth generation coral expert and certified GIA gemologist. She heads the studio of Antonino De Simone, a continuous family business for 180 years and Italy’s oldest coral production house.

With Gioia as my guide, I saw firsthand how coral is selected and worked by the studio’s artisans. It’s truly a hands-on business, calling for great care and a trained eye.

In this environmentally conscious age, it’s important to know that the coral used in Italian jewelry is harvested in the Mediterranean from a non-endangered species called Corallium rubrum which is completely different from reef coral.

Gioia also pointed out that, to ensure that this natural resource is protected; harvesting is done only by divers (not drag nets). Limits on daily harvesting and areas being harvested in a given time period ensure proper coral growth and balance of the ecosystem.

From palest pink to deepest red, coral has always said “Italy” to me. It is a personal favorite. You will be seeing more of it in the GemLily collection. I hope that, with the knowledge that it is eco-friendly, more of you will add it to your collections.

Most of my professional jewelry experience in Italy has been with the designer goldsmiths of Umbria and Tuscany , so the world of coral was a fresh and exhilarating adventure. In another recent trip, I explored Vicenza.

A fifth of Italy’s gold and jewelry production is manufactured in this lovely city 60 kilometers west of Venice.

In March, I made my first visit to Vicenza and discovered how many small family businesses, some generations old, contribute to the process. Often, to create that ring or bracelet you are wearing, as many as 10 studios or workshops have been involved. The designer, the wax modeler, the casting company that turns it to gold, the  diamond setter, the polisher — it takes many artists and artisans working together, to bring jewelry of all styles and price ranges to market.

It was a thrill to see the magic happen and understand how many master craftsmen touch even the simplest wedding band or bangle we may wear.

In 2011, I launched a small retail space at “A Touch of the Past,” a shop in Lambertville, New Jersey, across the river from New Hope, Pennsylvania. Picture “Washington Crossing the Delaware” and you’ve pretty much got the  location. The twin towns are renowned East Coast centers for arts, crafts, antiques and restaurants.

“A Touch of the Past” is open Wednesday through Sunday, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Come check out the GemLily display. If it’s a Sunday, you might find me there, updating the collection. Say hello. I’d be delighted to meet you.

GemLily is making appearances at art and antique shows in the New York Metro region.

Coming up: The 50th Anniversary Ridgefield Outdoor Antiques Market at historic Lounsbury House, 316 Main Street, Ridgefield, Connecticut. Saturday, May 5, from   10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

I will keep you posted as new shows land on the schedule.

Meanwhile, I’ll be tracking other jewelry news to bring to the GemLily blog. I’ll be looking for sources on jewelry, fashion and design that have the same focus on quality and craftsmanship that GemLily is committed to. If you spot anything you’d like to recommend, let me know by e-mailing me at Susanna@gemlily.com

j� n-�_�(��5%;font-family: “Cambria”,”serif”;mso-ascii-theme-font:major-latin;mso-hansi-theme-font:major-latin’>Visiting Torre del Greco I met Gioia De Simone, a gracious and lively young woman who is a fifth generation coral expert and certified GIA gemologist. She heads the studio of Antonino De Simone, a continuous family business for 180 years and Italy’s oldest coral production house.

With Gioia as my guide, I saw firsthand how coral is selected and worked by the studio’s artisans. It’s truly a hands-on business, calling for great care and a trained eye.

In this environmentally conscious age, it’s important to know that the coral used in Italian jewelry is harvested in the Mediterranean from a non-endangered species called Corallium rubrum which is completely different from reef coral.

Gioia also pointed out that, to ensure that this natural resource is protected; harvesting is done only by divers (not drag nets). Limits on daily harvesting and areas being harvested in a given time period ensure proper coral growth and balance of the ecosystem.

From palest pink to deepest red, coral has always said “Italy” to me. It is a personal favorite. You will be seeing more of it in the GemLily collection. I hope that, with the knowledge that it is eco-friendly, more of you will add it to your collections.

Most of my professional jewelry experience in Italy has been with the designer goldsmiths of Umbria and Tuscany , so the world of coral was a fresh and exhilarating adventure. In another recent trip, I explored Vicenza.

A fifth of Italy’s gold and jewelry production is manufactured in this lovely city 60 kilometers west of Venice.

In March, I made my first visit to Vicenza and discovered how many small family businesses, some generations old, contribute to the process. Often, to create that ring or bracelet you are wearing, as many as 10 studios or workshops have been involved. The designer, the wax modeler, the casting company that turns it to gold, the  diamond setter, the polisher — it takes many artists and artisans working together, to bring jewelry of all styles and price ranges to market.

It was a thrill to see the magic happen and understand how many master craftsmen touch even the simplest wedding band or bangle we may wear.

In 2011, I launched a small retail space at “A Touch of the Past,” a shop in Lambertville, New Jersey, across the river from New Hope, Pennsylvania. Picture “Washington Crossing the Delaware” and you’ve pretty much got the  location. The twin towns are renowned East Coast centers for arts, crafts, antiques and restaurants.

“A Touch of the Past” is open Wednesday through Sunday, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Come check out the GemLily display. If it’s a Sunday, you might find me there, updating the collection. Say hello. I’d be delighted to meet you.

GemLily is making appearances at art and antique shows in the New York region.

Coming up: The 50th Anniversary Ridgefield Outdoor Antiques Market at historic Lounsbury House, 316 Main Street, Ridgefield, Connecticut. Saturday, May 5, from   10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

I will keep you posted as new shows land on the schedule.

Meanwhile, I’ll be tracking other jewelry news to bring to the GemLily blog. I’ll be looking for sources on jewelry, fashion and design that have the same focus on quality and craftsmanship that GemLily is committed to. If you spot anything you’d like to recommend, let me know by e-mailing me at Susanna@gemlily.com

j� n-�_�(��5%;font-family: “Cambria”,”serif”;mso-ascii-theme-font:major-latin;mso-hansi-theme-font:major-latin’>Visiting Torre del Greco I met Gioia De Simone, a gracious and lively young woman who is a fifth generation coral expert and certified GIA gemologist. She heads the studio of Antonino De Simone, a continuous family business for 180 years and Italy’s oldest coral production house.

With Gioia as my guide, I saw firsthand how coral is selected and worked by the studio’s artisans. It’s truly a hands-on business, calling for great care and a trained eye.

In this environmentally conscious age, it’s important to know that the coral used in Italian jewelry is harvested in the Mediterranean from a non-endangered species called Corallium rubrum which is completely different from reef coral.

Gioia also pointed out that, to ensure that this natural resource is protected; harvesting is done only by divers (not drag nets). Limits on daily harvesting and areas being harvested in a given time period ensure proper coral growth and balance of the ecosystem.

From palest pink to deepest red, coral has always said “Italy” to me. It is a personal favorite. You will be seeing more of it in the GemLily collection. I hope that, with the knowledge that it is eco-friendly, more of you will add it to your collections.

Most of my professional jewelry experience in Italy has been with the designer goldsmiths of Umbria and Tuscany , so the world of coral was a fresh and exhilarating adventure. In another recent trip, I explored Vicenza.

A fifth of Italy’s gold and jewelry production is manufactured in this lovely city 60 kilometers west of Venice.

In March, I made my first visit to Vicenza and discovered how many small family businesses, some generations old, contribute to the process. Often, to create that ring or bracelet you are wearing, as many as 10 studios or workshops have been involved. The designer, the wax modeler, the casting company that turns it to gold, the  diamond setter, the polisher — it takes many artists and artisans working together, to bring jewelry of all styles and price ranges to market.

It was a thrill to see the magic happen and understand how many master craftsmen touch even the simplest wedding band or bangle we may wear.

In 2011, I launched a small retail space at “A Touch of the Past,” a shop in Lambertville, New Jersey, across the river from New Hope, Pennsylvania. Picture “Washington Crossing the Delaware” and you’ve pretty much got the  location. The twin towns are renowned East Coast centers for arts, crafts, antiques and restaurants.

“A Touch of the Past” is open Wednesday through Sunday, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Come check out the GemLily display. If it’s a Sunday, you might find me there, updating the collection. Say hello. I’d be delighted to meet you.

GemLily is making appearances at art and antique shows in the New York region.

Coming up: The 50th Anniversary Ridgefield Outdoor Antiques Market at historic Lounsbury House, 316 Main Street, Ridgefield, Connecticut. Saturday, May 5, from   10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

I will keep you posted as new shows land on the schedule.

Meanwhile

Meanwhile, I’ll be tracking other jewelry news to bring to the GemLily blog. I’ll be looking for sources on jewelry, fashion and design that have the same focus on quality and craftsmanship that GemLily is committed to. If you spot anything you’d like to recommend, let me know by e-mailing me at Susanna@gemlily.com

j� n-�_�(��5%;font-family: “Cambria”,”serif”;mso-ascii-theme-font:major-latin;mso-hansi-theme-font:major-latin’>Visiting Torre del Greco I met Gioia De Simone, a gracious and lively young woman who is a fifth generation coral expert and certified GIA gemologist. She heads the studio of Antonino De Simone, a continuous family business for 180 years and Italy’s oldest coral production house.

With Gioia as my guide, I saw firsthand how coral is selected and worked by the studio’s artisans. It’s truly a hands-on business, calling for great care and a trained eye.

In this environmentally conscious age, it’s important to know that the coral used in Italian jewelry is harvested in the Mediterranean from a non-endangered species called Corallium rubrum which is completely different from reef coral.

Gioia also pointed out that, to ensure that this natural resource is protected; harvesting is done only by divers (not drag nets). Limits on daily harvesting and areas being harvested in a given time period ensure proper coral growth and balance of the ecosystem.

From palest pink to deepest red, coral has always said “Italy” to me. It is a personal favorite. You will be seeing more of it in the GemLily collection. I hope that, with the knowledge that it is eco-friendly, more of you will add it to your collections.

Most of my professional jewelry experience in Italy has been with the designer goldsmiths of Umbria and Tuscany , so the world of coral was a fresh and exhilarating adventure. In another recent trip, I explored Vicenza.

A fifth of Italy’s gold and jewelry production is manufactured in this lovely city 60 kilometers west of Venice.

In March, I made my first visit to Vicenza and discovered how many small family businesses, some generations old, contribute to the process. Often, to create that ring or bracelet you are wearing, as many as 10 studios or workshops have been involved. The designer, the wax modeler, the casting company that turns it to gold, the  diamond setter, the polisher — it takes many artists and artisans working together, to bring jewelry of all styles and price ranges to market.

It was a thrill to see the magic happen and understand how many master craftsmen touch even the simplest wedding band or bangle we may wear.

In 2011, I launched a small retail space at “A Touch of the Past,” a shop in Lambertville, New Jersey, across the river from New Hope, Pennsylvania. Picture “Washington Crossing the Delaware” and you’ve pretty much got the  location. The twin towns are renowned East Coast centers for arts, crafts, antiques and restaurants.

“A Touch of the Past” is open Wednesday through Sunday, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Come check out the GemLily display. If it’s a Sunday, you might find me there, updating the collection. Say hello. I’d be delighted to meet you.

GemLily is making appearances at art and antique shows in the New York region.

Coming up: The 50th Anniversary Ridgefield Outdoor Antiques Market at historic Lounsbury House, 316 Main Street, Ridgefield, Connecticut. Saturday, May 5, from   10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

I will keep you posted as new shows land on the schedule.

Meanwhile, I be tracking other jewelry news to bring to the GemLily blog.  I’ll be looking for sources on jewelry, fashion and design that have the same focus on quality and craftsmanship that GemLily is committed to. If you spot anything you’d like to recommend let me know by emailing me at Susanna@gemlily.com

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